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Thread: Origin of your surname

  1. #281
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    My own surname is Scottish in origin and from what I know of it the earliest written records of this surname come from the early 1200's however the actual family is thought to be older than that. Spelling of the surname has changed a bit over the centuries but is still similar to what it originally was.

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  3. #282
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    Mine is French in origin, and was not anglicized when the family immigrated to the US. The base part of the family name is unchanged since at least the 1400's in Auvergne, France, which is as far back as I've been able to trace my direct line. Supposedly it is occupation in origin from Old French, having to do with either making pottery or living near where that was done.
    Last edited by linthos; 06-13-2019 at 12:07 AM.

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  5. #283
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    Can someone here recommend some website or online-book about etymology of italian surnames?
    Language of the source doesn't matter.

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  7. #284
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    Chile Spanish Empire (1506-1701) Italy 1861-1946
    Mine paternal Surname is Baraona (a toponimic with vasc origin), and my maternal surname is Lioi (south italian, from Basilicata... but the original form is Lioj, so I think it can be like makedonian... )

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  9. #285
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    Mine is a common German name. I can trace my paternal lineage back to abt. 1550. The name is completely unchanged since that time. It can generally be assumed to have been a fixed surname since abt. 1350.

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  11. #286
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    Quote Originally Posted by JMcB View Post
    Hello Erik,

    My surname in it's original form would have been Mac Giola/Gille Brighde, and it's Gaelic in origins. Although, some have contended that a portion of it may have come from an Old Norse word.

    It means; Son of a servant of St. Brigid (of Kildare).

    At the risk of boring you to tears, I will share with you some of what I've learned about it of late. Parts of it may be a little redundant as I'm just copying some of the sources I've collected.

    -----------------------

    It has been claimed by Patrick Dineen that Gaelic names consisting of the word giolla ‘servant’ and the name of a saint or the title of an ecclesiastical dignitary became popu- lar among assimilated Danes in Ireland.80 Names consisting of Gilla- plus a saint’s name have a similar meaning to another group of Celtic names, those consisting of the element Máel- ‘bald, tonsured’ plus a saint’s name, e. g. Máelmuire ‘servant of Mary’. These latter names were quite common in Ireland as early as the seventh century, while the names in Gilla- did not become common until after the year 900, perhaps as a result of a Danish fashion.81 One of the earliest recorded examples is Gilla Pátraic, son of Ímar (i. e. Ívar), who died in 982, and Brian Ó Cuív has seen the choice of this name for Ívar’s son as evidence that the Viking settlers in Ireland owed devotion to St Patrick.

    It is interesting to note that the Vikings from the Gaelic-speaking areas carried the custom of forming personal names in Gilla with them to their other colonies in the British Isles. It is not surprising to find such names in Scandinavian place-names in Dumfriesshire, where the Gaelic element was strong. Here we find Gill’Eoin in Gillenbie, Gillae, a short form, in Gillesbie, and Gilmartin in Gillemartin beck.82 The scandinavianised form Gilli of the short form occurs in Gilsland in Cumberland, Gilston in the Central Lowlands of Scotland, and Gilby in Lincolnshire, while *Gilliman, a by-name meaning ‘servant of Gilli’ is the specific of Gilmonby in Yorkshire.83


    80 P. S. Dineen, An Irish-English Dictionary (Dublin, 1927), s.v. giolla.

    81 Cf. B. Ó Cuív, ‘Borrowed elements in the corpus of Irish personal names from medieval times’, Nomina 3 (1979), pp. 40–51, at pp. 46–47.

    82 G. Fellows-Jensen, Scandinavian Settlement Names in the North-West (SSNNW), Navnestudier 25 (Copenhagen, 1985), pp. 31, 126.

    83 Fellows-Jensen, SSNNW, p. 126; eadem, ‘Scandinavians in Southern Scotland?’, p. 46; eadem, SSNY, p. 7.

    From: The Vikings and Their Victims: The Verdict of The Names (pg. 29) - Gillian Fellows-Jensen.


    ---------------


    Note: The Imar (or Ivar) mentioned above was a famous Viking who ruled in Dublin, Ireland. Interestingly enough, he and his brothers often allied themselves with the Northern Uí Néill, an Irish Clan that ruled in the area of County Donegal, which happens to be where the name Mac Giolla Brighde is supposed to have originated. We also know that it was common for them to seal their alliances by intermarrying. For example, Ivar's brother Amlaib was married to the daughter of the Uí Néill's king. And that in later years, alliances between the Northern Uí Néill and the Vikings of Dublin became a regular occurrence.


    ----------------


    The Gil- names have had a similar origin. Many centuries ago there lived persons who answered the name, Gilblank. In some of these names, Gil, Irish giolla, older form gilla, meant 'servant,' as Giolla-brighde, pron. gilla-breeda, servant of St. Brigid. And now we have the surname, Mac-Giolla-Bhrighde, descendant of the servant of St. Brigid—in English Gilbride, Kilbride. In others of the Gil- names the Gil- prefix must be translated by 'person, fellow,' as Mac-Giolla-bháin, descendant of the white (haired) person, now MacIlvaine.

    The Mul- names originated much earlier than those in Gil. In fact, we find no record of Gil- names until after the Danish invasion; and some maintain that the word gilla is of Danish origin.

    From The Irish Ecclesiastical Record, Volume III, Part I - Eugene O'Growney, 1898.


    -----------------


    Gilla, Prefix, said to be borrowed from Scandinavians. Index, pg. 185. From: Christian Inscriptions in the Irish Language, George Petrie.



    Giolla is probably derived from the Norse; gisl, a pledge or hostage. It only became common during the Danish period when it was largely used by the Northman, on their conversion to Christianity, to form Christian names. In this connection it signifies servant or devotee. At other times it has to be translated youth, boy, lad, etc ...

    - from: Irish Names and Surnames, by Patrick Woulf (from a footnote on Pages 8 & 9)


    -------------------


    7) Gaelic Saints. St. Bridget (Brigid) is found in a West Cumberland group of sites—Beckermet, Bridekirk, Brig- ham, Kirkbride and Moresby, of which the first three have tenth century monuments, but none appears to be earlier than that period. The inference is that the dedication was brought here by Christian Norse from over the Irish Sea

    Patron Saints of the Diocese of Carlisle. By T. H. B. GRAHAM, M.A. and W. G. COLLINGWOOD, M.A., F.S.A.



    http://archaeologydataservice.ac.uk/...vol25_0003.pdf

    --------------------------


    The adoption of overtly Christian names among the viking elite in Ireland may be traced to the tenth century. These names have ‘Mael’ or ‘Gille’ as the first element, meaning ‘servant’ or ‘devotee’, and the second element is usually a saint’s name in the genitive case. Examples from Irish chronicles include: Gille Pátraic (d. 983), the son of Gille Muire (d. 1013), Gille Ciaráin (d. 1014), and Mael Muire (d. 1021). Apart from expressions of devotion to Mary or Christ, the names refer to Gaelic saints. These names therefore suggest the adoption of cults of Irish saints by the royal [Viking] dynasty of Dublin-in the early to mid tenth century.


    Religious and Cultural Boundaries between Vikings and Irish: The Evidence of Conversion

    Clare Downham


    http://www.academia.edu/2020479/Reli..._of_Conversion


    -------------------------


    Clare Downham also implies that there's a link between the Vikings and a devotion to St. Brigid:

    The development of a cult of Brigit at Dyserth (Wales) may point to links with viking-colonies in Ireland.

    Viking kings of Britain and Ireland: The Dynasty of Ivarr to A.D. 1014 (Pg 209)

    List of archdeacons of the Isles[edit]

    Beoan [mac Eoin] Mac Cholgain (Bean Johannis Macuilquen), 1372–1390/97[4]
    Niall Mac Iomhair, 1390–1408[4]
    Crisdean Mac Domhnaill Elich, fl. 1408[4]
    Gille-Brighde Mac Dughaill, died x 1416[4]
    John de Carrick (Eoin a Charraig), provided 1416[4]
    Eachann MacGill-Eain, 1416–1441[5]
    Andrew of Dunoon, 1441–1456x1457[6]
    Niall Mac Cormaig, provided 1455 [6]
    Aonghas of the Isles, provided 1456 [6]
    Gilbert Smerles, 1457–1460 [6]
    James Borthwick, provided 1457 [6]
    Donnchadh [_], fl. 1462 [6]
    Crisdean mac Gille-Brighde (Bricii), fl. 1463–1469 [6]
    Gilbert Wright, fl. 1472 [6]
    Niall mac Gille-Brighde (MacIlvride, MacYlwryd, Makkikbreid), fl. 1476–1479 [6]
    Thomas Clerk (Tomas Cleireach), fl. 1500[7]
    Thomas Fleming, died 1516 [6]
    Richard Lawson, 1516–1541x1544 [6]
    Ruairidh MacGill-Eain (Roderick MacLean), fl. 1544–1548 [3]
    Gill-Easbaig Mac an Rothaich (Archibald Munro), fl. 1548 [3]
    Domhnall Mac an Rothaich (Donald Munro), fl 1553–1563x1584 [3]
    Domhnall Carsuel (Donald Carswell), died 1592 [3]
    Alasdair Caimbeul (Alexander Campbell), fl. 1592 [3]

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  13. #287
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trelvern View Post
    List of archdeacons of the Isles[edit]

    Beoan [mac Eoin] Mac Cholgain (Bean Johannis Macuilquen), 1372–1390/97[4]
    Niall Mac Iomhair, 1390–1408[4]
    Crisdean Mac Domhnaill Elich, fl. 1408[4]
    Gille-Brighde Mac Dughaill, died x 1416[4]
    John de Carrick (Eoin a Charraig), provided 1416[4]
    Eachann MacGill-Eain, 1416–1441[5]
    Andrew of Dunoon, 1441–1456x1457[6]
    Niall Mac Cormaig, provided 1455 [6]
    Aonghas of the Isles, provided 1456 [6]
    Gilbert Smerles, 1457–1460 [6]
    James Borthwick, provided 1457 [6]
    Donnchadh [_], fl. 1462 [6]
    Crisdean mac Gille-Brighde (Bricii), fl. 1463–1469 [6]
    Gilbert Wright, fl. 1472 [6]
    Niall mac Gille-Brighde (MacIlvride, MacYlwryd, Makkikbreid), fl. 1476–1479 [6]
    Thomas Clerk (Tomas Cleireach), fl. 1500[7]
    Thomas Fleming, died 1516 [6]
    Richard Lawson, 1516–1541x1544 [6]
    Ruairidh MacGill-Eain (Roderick MacLean), fl. 1544–1548 [3]
    Gill-Easbaig Mac an Rothaich (Archibald Munro), fl. 1548 [3]
    Domhnall Mac an Rothaich (Donald Munro), fl 1553–1563x1584 [3]
    Domhnall Carsuel (Donald Carswell), died 1592 [3]
    Alasdair Caimbeul (Alexander Campbell), fl. 1592 [3]
    Thank you my friend!

    I forgot all about that post. If I may ask, what is the source of your list. I’d like to add it to what I already have.
    Known Paper Trail: 45.3% English, 29.7% Scottish, 12.5% Irish, 6.25% German & 6.25% Italian. Or: 87.5% British Isles, 6.25% German & 6.25% Italian.
    LivingDNA: 88.1% British Isles (59.7% English, 27% Scottish & 1.3% Irish), 5.9% Europe South (Aegian 3.4%, Tuscany 1.3%, Sardinia 1.1%), 4.4% Europe NW (Scandinavia) & 1.6% Europe East, (Mordovia).
    FT Big Y: I1-Z140 branch I-F2642 >Y1966 >Y3649 >A13241 >Y3647 >A13248 (circa 620 AD) >A13242/YSEQ (circa 765 AD) >A13252/YSEQ (circa 1630 AD).

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  15. #288
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    Quote Originally Posted by JMcB View Post
    Thank you my friend!

    I forgot all about that post. If I may ask, what is the source of your list. I’d like to add it to what I already have.

    The source:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Archdeacon_of_the_Isles

    and i missed the fifth!
    Last edited by Trelvern; 08-03-2019 at 08:48 AM.

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  17. #289
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    France Occitania Lorraine Star of David
    My surname comes from the Occitan language. It is somewhat common in the Occitan speaking regions between the Garonne and Rhône river (with a frequency peak in the Ségala region). It also exists with variant spellings in Catalonia and the Italian Piedmont.
    It comes from a rather flattering Latin adjective (related to personality).

    Quote Originally Posted by Rethel View Post
    Can someone here recommend some website or online-book about etymology of italian surnames?
    Language of the source doesn't matter.
    https://www.cognomix.it/ Gives you frequency maps. I don’t know how accurate they are, but they will usually help you pinpoint the area of origin of a surname (that’s not etymology per se, but it can help).
    Last edited by loxias; 08-03-2019 at 09:35 AM.

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  19. #290
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    Dalluin, tal (foot) et lhûn (blue) in sindarin : bluefoot (pied bleu) . Which Haplogroup for the Sindars ?

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