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Thread: J1 expansions from Mesopotamia to Arabia and Yemen

  1. #1
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    J1 expansions from Mesopotamia to Arabia and Yemen

    New study with insights that parallel our findings at the J1 project especially when we look at my own subclade FGC3723!

    "Subsequent expansions of J1 show the Mesopotamian branch extending to Arabia and Yemen at about 4 ka"

    What we always suspected at the J1 project. I'm quite sure that my FGC3723 ancestors were part of that Mesoptamian branch reaching the South of the Arabian peninsula.

    Source:

    Mapping Post-Glacial expansions: The Peopling of Southwest Asia

    Archaeological, palaeontological and geological evidence shows that post-glacial warming released human populations from their various climate-bound refugia. Yet specific connections between these refugia and the timing and routes of post-glacial migrations that ultimately established modern patterns of genetic variation remain elusive. Here, we use Y-chromosome markers combined with autosomal data to reconstruct population expansions from regional refugia in Southwest Asia. Populations from three regions in particular possess distinctive autosomal genetic signatures indicative of likely refugia: one, in the north, centered around the eastern coast of the Black Sea, the second, with a more Levantine focus, and the third in the southern Arabian Peninsula. Modern populations from these three regions carry the widest diversity and may indeed represent the most likely descendants of the populations responsible for the Neolithic cultures of Southwest Asia. We reveal the distinct and datable expansion routes of populations from these three refugia throughout Southwest Asia and into Europe and North Africa and discuss the possible correlations of these migrations to various cultural and climatic events evident in the archaeological record of the past 15,000 years.

    http://www.nature.com/articles/srep4...jects_genetics
    Last edited by Shamash; 01-07-2017 at 01:39 AM.

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    A possible reason for this exodus was an extraordinary drought that devastated ancient Mesopotamia:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/4.2_kiloyear_event

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    A reasonable article but it seems a bit outdated, I would like to see more NGS technologies because that article could had been published five years ago and we need more Y-DNA full sequences and new data from unexplored Northern Middle Eastern and African regions.
    J1 FGC5987 to FGC6175 (188 new SNPs)
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    North_Swedish + PT + PT + PT @ 3.96 EUtest 4

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    Quote Originally Posted by RCO View Post
    A reasonable article but it seems a bit outdated, I would like to see more NGS technologies because that article could had been published five years ago and we need more Y-DNA full sequences and new data from unexplored Northern Middle Eastern and African regions.

    Well, that's on my 2017 wish list too!

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    BATWING expansion history for J1 in Fig. 2a


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    The authors only used a NGS tree in this case: "e.g. E-M81 is estimated at 14.2 kya reported at YTree". I have always said that my own J1 branch, first M365, then FGC5987 to FGC6175 came from the Northern Middle East, probably from the Caspian areas because we have relatively close STRs matches from Northern Iran in the Gilaki population, I always tried to have a full Y_DNA sequence from that Gilaki samples, I offered to pay, but as far as I know no FGC6064 has been publicly tested from the Caspian Sea, Northern Iran. When FTDNA created the J1-M267 Project they didn't want to invite our J1-M365 Project because we always said J1 came from the Northern regions of Eastern Anatolia, the Caucasus, the Caspian Sea, Northern Iran, Zagros to the South and the basal J1 branches never were related to the Southern Semitic languages. J1 in the Arabian Plate and Levant is relatively new and specific to some derived clusters downstream of P58 while the biggest diversity and longest J1 TMRCAs are Northern. Now we urgently need to know the geography and distribution of basal J1 types like FGC6064 with very ancient bifurcations in those regions. We need a good NGS investigation in the Northern Iranian J1 types because some types of J1 were possibly Indo-European for a good time and they can be among the first ones related to the autosomal component Caucasus hunter-gatherer (CHG).
    Last edited by RCO; 01-07-2017 at 01:09 PM.
    J1 FGC5987 to FGC6175 (188 new SNPs)
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    "Our study has identified the Caucasus refugium as the likely source for the J1 and J2 haplogroups that now dominate Southwest Asia, and previously appeared to mark the Neolithic Revolution’s expansion into Europe"

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    Quote Originally Posted by Shamash View Post
    "Our study has identified the Caucasus refugium as the likely source for the J1 and J2 haplogroups that now dominate Southwest Asia, and previously appeared to mark the Neolithic Revolution’s expansion into Europe"
    Do you agree with that statement?

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    As far as J1 is concerned the Caucasus is definitely a very good candidate but we'll need a lot more aDNA to verify that! But think of the Satsurblia J1 man. This could be a hint...

    But as far as the Mesopotamian J1 branch is concerned FGC11 with all its descendants in the Arabian peninsula is very likely to have been part of that J1 expansion 4kybp

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    Those of you who are more knowledgeable about Y-DNA J1, what is your impression of the Ethiopian lineages?

    According to this study, Ethiopia has the second-highest diversity after the Caucasus. But it seems difficult to guess when J1 would have migrated to Africa. The lack of J1 in the Mesolithic and PPNB Levant may suggest a more recent arrival, in the Bronze Age. But the high diversity in Ethiopia, and high levels in Cushitic and North Omotic groups rather than just Semitic speakers, suggest otherwise. Then again we are lacking aDNA from Arabia, so perhaps the ancient Arabian diversity is represented in Ethiopia, and was masked in Arabia by more recent bottlenecks?

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