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Thread: fun map of where Irish names are

  1. #1
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    fun map of where Irish names are

    hey family...there are at least 3 separate spots on this map where our family name or variation can be found (Whalen, Whelan, Phalen, O'Failoan and a dozen more)
    ...one where we were Princes/Kings, one where we were Church abbots and one where we were Barons
    ...none related, just coincidence given the popularity of the Irish root of our name
    ....Wolf

    can you find them?

    Irish names.jpg

    Mike
    Furthest Y line=Patrick Whealen 1816-1874, b.Tipperary Co. Ire. d. Kincardine Ont.

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  3. #2
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    Thanks,what a great map! My paternal grandfather is from Ennis and that's actually roughly where this map puts my own surname.

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    What I really like about YDNA testing, it is really confirming Clan histories and track maps like this one. R-L226 is one the four known haplogroups that are dominated by Irish ancestors. The Dal Cais originated in the north central part of Munster - primarily the western edge of Tipperary County. This is just east and south of the large long lake - Lough Derg (just east of the harp on the map).

    Just east of the lake, you find O'Briens (1st most common), Kennedy (4th), Hogan (6th) as well as Gleason (which I am trying to get Maurice to upgrade his cousins to 67 markers). A little further south, you find O'Brien again (1st) and O'Casey (2nd), McGrath (4th), Carey (13th) which is the most genetically related cluster to the Casey cluster as well as Morrisey. A little west from there you find yet a third O'Brien (1st), O'Mahoney (7th) and Callaghan (10th). Southwest of the lake you find a second cluster of McGrath (4th) as well as McNamara. In the extreme southwest tip of Ireland, you find a second Hogan cluster (6th), Lynch (8th) as well as Bresnan. Quite a ways east of the lake you find Nolan (11th). All surnames with five or more testers are either on the map in southern Ireland with two having English origins. This includes all thirteen most common surnames under L226.

    So L226 tracks this map quite as well as it tracks Clan history as well as these clusters of these surnames track the early Irish census records. Only Butler and Hart are not found on this map due to Irish's favorite person Cromwell. But these English lines did adopt a lot of Irish L226 sons into their families or some of the L226 men took English names for other reasons. Since Brian Boru was the first to conquer all of Ireland, the O'Brien's (1st) flourished as well as their related line, Casey (2nd) who flourished as well.

    As additional testing continues to expand our knowledge of L226, genetic testing continues to track Clan history and genealogical records. However, we are now able to chart 75 % of L226 which is revealing that there ten different O'Brien clusters just under L226 and we just discovered the third Casey cluster under L226. Genetic testing is revealing much more genetic varieties of surname lines that can not be connected in less than 1,000 years ago. It is also really great in revealing a deluge of related lines due to both shared YSTR signatures and shared YSNP branches.
    Last edited by RobertCasey; 02-08-2017 at 09:05 PM.

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    I would like to get my cousin and Uncle O'Dwyer tested. My 3rd Great Grandfather Philip O'Dwyer lived (and was possibly born) in Clare, Ireland. 2nd GGF Joseph O'Dwyer came over in the 1800s. I am curious as to whether Philip was a descendant of the O'Dwyer chieftains and/or his wife Nora (Lenora?) was a Butler. Reason I think this is well... location (O'Dwyers were pushed out of Kilnamanagh into Clare and Connaught by our favorite Cromwell (not!)... Philip O'Dwyer was the last Chief (though a few generations before MY Philip) and his wife was named or nicknamed Nora as well. In addition to that, I have had autosomal testing done by FTDNA, and guess which family shows up several times in my Irish American cousins: Butler from Tipperary and surrounding areas like Limerick, and Butler of Ormond. Also Fitzgeralds (and Mom reminded me there were in fact - according to family tradition - many Fitzgerald relations with her O'Dwyers... didn't even connect that till I mentioned the Butler bit). I know from doing a bit of research that the O'Dwyers started marrying the Butlers around the 1200s? In the 1600s (can't find the exact manuscript I was reading right now - bookmarked somewhere!) at least 5 O'Dwyer chieftains married Butler women - since the Butlers and O'Dwyers were closely allied and involved in the rebellions of the mid 1600s... etc. Surprised it still shows up in the autosomal, but then when you remarry into the same gene pool over and over... that tends to happen?

    Thoughts guys? Do you guys have any O'Dwyers participating in the projects? My Grandfather's mother was also a McGuire - probably from Fermanagh or Roscommon (I get distant 4th to 5th cousin McGuires from those areas - but my particular McGuires were more recently from Trenton in Ontario - mixed with MacAulays and MacDonalds, but from Ireland originally and spent a few generations in Canada then married with my O'Dwyers from upper state New York south of the lake where Trenton is!).

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    I did not see my surname: Ennis. But I did see what has been claimed to be a possible origin for the name: Hennessey. It was located close to where I think my Ennis ancestors lived.

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    Quote Originally Posted by etripp17 View Post
    I did not see my surname: Ennis. But I did see what has been claimed to be a possible origin for the name: Hennessey. It was located close to where I think my Ennis ancestors lived.
    Considering that Ennis seems to come from Ó hAonghuis/Ó hAonghusa which is also the Gaelic form of O'Hennessey I would say you're probably correct with your linking to the Hennessey on the map.

    I found a handful of the names in my family tree on that map. Now if only I could break down the giant brickwalls.

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    I notice that coastal Leinster (especially the area from Dublin to Kilkenny) on the map seems to have a near absence of the "Mc" and "Mac" surnames that characterize Ulster, Connacht, and the western coast, and very few of the "O'" surnames of Cork/Kerry. On the other hand, a lot of Norman and English sounding names there (as well as in Connacht but you see a lot of the Mc/Mac surnames in Connacht and not in Leinster).
    Last edited by Sikeliot; 09-13-2017 at 05:43 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sikeliot View Post
    I notice that coastal Leinster (especially the area from Dublin to Kilkenny) on the map seems to have a near absence of the "Mc" and "Mac" surnames that characterize Ulster, Connacht, and the western coast, and very few of the "O'" surnames of Cork/Kerry. On the other hand, a lot of Norman and English sounding names there (as well as in Connacht but you see a lot of the Mc/Mac surnames in Connacht and not in Leinster).
    A lot of the O and Mac was dropped off Irish names.

    Most Irish surnames were anglicised during the second half of the 16th century (1550-1600), and appear for the first time in in an English dress in the State documents of that period. The anglicisation seems to have been the work of Anglo-Irish government officials possessing, in some instances at least, a knowledge of the Irish language. The present anglicised forms, generally speaking, date from that period.
    http://www.libraryireland.com/names/...h-surnames.php

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jessie View Post
    A lot of the O and Mac was dropped off Irish names.

    So maybe in Leinster it happened more because of the region being most quickly Anglicized?

    I know some of the surnames rarely have their original form. Murphy, which is now the most common surname in Ireland, was originally Anglicized to McMurrough (which also I assume has become "Murray"?), I have heard, but I have never seen this in real life among any Irish person though. I have seen McMurray and I think their family was from Roscommon or Mayo.
    Last edited by Sikeliot; 09-13-2017 at 06:22 AM.

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    It's nice to see a version of my surname represented twice. Once in Donegal and once in Antrim. Although, mine is the Scottish variant McBryde, which was first found in Arran and now is mostly found in Lanarkshire. It's believed the name originated in County Donegal as: Mac Giolla Brighde, meaning; Son of a servant of St. Brigid.

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