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Thread: Genetic Genealogy and Ancient DNA in the News

  1. #2611
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    Quote Originally Posted by Generalissimo View Post
    Ha-le-fucking-luja !!!!
    Check out my Hidden Content
    My Y-DNA: Q-M242 -> Q-L232 -> Q-L275 -> Q-M378 -> Q-Y2016 -> Q-L245 -> Q-FGC1904 -> Q-Y2209 -> Q-Y2225 -> Q-Y2197 -> Q-Y2750 -> Q-YP1004 -> Q-YP3924;
    My mtDNA: K1a1b1a;

    My dad's mtDNA: K2a2a;

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  3. #2612
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    And now the paper:

    Quote Originally Posted by pmokeefe View Post
    Ancient DNA sheds light on the genetic origins of early Iron Age Philistines

    Michal Feldman, Daniel M. Master , Raffaela A. Bianco, Marta Burri, Philipp W. Stockhammer , Alissa Mittnik , Adam J. Aja, Choongwon Jeong, and Johannes Krause

    Abstract
    The ancient Mediterranean port city of Ashkelon, identified as “Philistine” during the Iron Age, underwent a marked cultural change between the Late Bronze and the early Iron Age. It has been long debated whether this change was driven by a substantial movement of people, possibly linked to a larger migration of the so-called “Sea Peoples.” Here, we report genome-wide data of 10 Bronze and Iron Age individuals from Ashkelon. We find that the early Iron Age population was genetically distinct due to a European-related admixture. This genetic signal is no longer detectible in the later Iron Age population. Our results support that a migration event occurred during the Bronze to Iron Age transition in Ashkelon but did not leave a long-lasting genetic signature.

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  5. #2613
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    Quote Originally Posted by rozenfeld View Post
    And now the paper:
    boo, poor Y-chromosome reporting. Where's Genetiker when we need him?

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  7. #2614
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    Quote Originally Posted by hartaisarlag View Post
    boo, poor Y-chromosome reporting. Where's Genetiker when we need him?
    I’m gonna check it out when I get home from work!
    My Y Line: J2a-L210>Z489>Z482>Y15222

    My Maternal Y: R1b-U152>Z36>Y156527

    Other Y lines: 3x Great Grandfather on Maternal side: J2a-S25258>SK1336, 5x Great Grandfather on Maternal side: E-V13>A7135, 6x Great Grandfather on Maternal side: J1-Z2331>L829

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  9. #2615
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    https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/692871v1

    Late Upper Palaeolithic hunter-gatherers in the Central Mediterranean: new archaeological and genetic data from the Late Epigravettian burial Oriente C (Favignana, Sicily)

    Giulio Catalano, Domenico Lo Vetro, Pier Francesco Fabbri, Swapan Mallick, David Reich, Nadin Rohland, Luca Sineo, Iain Mathieson, Fabio Martini

    doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/692871

    Abstract

    Grotta d'Oriente, a small coastal cave located on the island of Favignana (Sicily, Italy) is a key site for the study of the early human colonization of Sicily. The individual known as Oriente C was found in the lower portion of an anthropogenic deposit containing typical local Late Upper Palaeolithic (Late Epigravettian) stone assemblages. Two radiocarbon dates on charcoal from the deposit containing the burial are consistent with the archaeological context and refer Oriente C to a period spanning about 14,200-13,800 cal. BP. Anatomical features are close to those of Late Upper Palaeolithic populations of the Mediterranean and show strong affinity with Palaeolithic individuals of San Teodoro. Here we present new ancient DNA data from Oriente C. Our results, confirming previous genetic analysis, suggest a substantial genetic homogeneity among Late Epigravettian hunter-gatherer populations of Central Mediterranean, presumably as a consequence of continuous gene flow among different groups, or a range expansion following the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM).

    Note: this sample was analyzed earlier and published in "The genomic history of southeastern Europe", but now they resequenced it and getter better coverage.

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  11. #2616
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    https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/...002/ajpa.23887

    Ancient DNA and bioarchaeological perspectives on European and African diversity and relationships on the colonial Delaware frontier

    Raquel E. Fleskes, Karin S. Bruwelheide, Frankie L. West, Douglas W. Owsley, Daniel R. Griffith, Kathryn G. Barca, Graciela S. Cabana, Theodore G. Schurr

    First published: 04 July 2019

    https://doi.org/10.1002/ajpa.23887

    Funding information: The University of Pennsylvania

    Abstract

    Objectives

    Ancient DNA (aDNA) and standard osteological analyses applied to 11 skeletons at a late 17th to early 18th century farmstead site in Delaware to investigate the biological and social factors of settlement and slavery in colonial America.

    Materials and methods

    Osteological analysis and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequencing were conducted for all individuals and the resulting data contextualized with archaeological and documentary evidence.

    Results

    Individuals of European and African descent were spatially separated in this colonial cemetery. The skeletal remains exhibited differences in osteological features and maternal genetic ancestry. A specific mtDNA haplotype appeared in a subset of the European‐descended individuals suggesting they were maternally related. Individuals of African descent were not maternally related, and instead showed a diversity of haplotypes affiliated with present‐day Western, Central, and Eastern regions of Africa.

    Discussion

    Along with the bioarchaeological and documentary evidence, the aDNA findings contribute to our understanding of life on the colonial Delaware frontier. Evidence of maternal relatedness among European‐descended individuals at the site demonstrates kin‐based settlements in 17th century Delaware and provides preliminary identifications of individuals. The maternal genetic diversity of the individuals with African descent aligns with the routes of the trans‐Atlantic slave trade but broadens our understanding of the ancestries of persons involved in it. Burial positioning, osteological pathology, and lack of maternal kinship among individuals of African descent provide tangible evidence for the emergence of racialized labor and society in Delaware during the late17th century.

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  13. #2617
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    Genetic evidence suggests relationship between contemporary Bulgarian population and Iron Age steppe dwellers from Pontic-Caspian steppe.
    Todor Chobanov, Svetoslav Stamov

    doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/687384
    Abstract
    Ancient DNA analysis on the ancestry of European populations conducted in the last decade came to the puzzling conclusion that while all contemporary European populations can be best represented as an admixture of 3 ancestral populations: Early European Neolithic farmers (ENF), Western Hunter-Gatherers (WHG) and Ancestral North Eurasians (ANE), contemporary Bulgarians and few other SEE populations can also be represented as an admixture of two groups only, Early European Neolithic farmers and contemporary Caucasian people equally well. If modeled as an admixture of two groups only, the ANE component presented in contemporary Bulgarians would have arrived on the Balkans with hypothetical ANE (Ancestral North Eurasians)rich Caucasian population. In this paper, we test the hypothesis that increased Caucasian component in contemporary SE Europeans, has been introduced on the Balkans by migrating Iron Age steppe dwellers from Pontic Caspian steppe. We analyze available DNA datasets from both ancient and contemporary samples and identify a Caucasian signal, carried to Balkan populations by the nomadic dwellers of IA Saltovo Maiaki Culture, located on the northern slope of Caucasus Mountains and adjacent steppe regions. We also identify two additional sources of Caucasian admixture in SEE populations, which are not specific to Bulgarian population only. Based on the results from our population genetic analysis we suggest that contemporary Bulgarians are an admixture of ancestral Slavonic groups, rich on locally absorbed EEF DNA and Proto Bulgarians, rich on Caucasian DNA and genetically related to the bearers of the Saltovo Mayaki Culture from 6 to 8 century AD.

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  15. #2618
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    https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/690545v1
    Genetic contributions to variation in human stature in prehistoric Europe
    Samantha L. Cox, Christopher B. Ruff, Robert M. Maier, Iain Mathieson

    The relative contributions of genetics and environment to temporal and geographic variation in human height remain largely unknown. Ancient DNA has identified changes in genetic ancestry over time, but it is not clear whether those changes in ancestry are associated with changes in height. Here, we directly test whether changes over the past 38,000 years in European height predicted using DNA from 1071 ancient individuals are consistent with changes observed in 1159 skeletal remains from comparable populations. We show that the observed decrease in height between the Early Upper Paleolithic and the Mesolithic is qualitatively predicted by genetics. Similarly, both skeletal and genetic height remained constant between the Mesolithic and Neolithic and increased between the Neolithic and Bronze Age. Sitting height changes much less than standing height–consistent with genetic predictions–although genetics predicts a small Bronze Age increase that is not observed in skeletal remains. Geographic variation in stature is also qualitatively consistent with genetic predictions, particularly with respect to latitude. We find that the changes in genetic height between the Neolithic and Bronze Age may be driven by polygenic adaptation. Finally, we hypothesize that an observed decrease in genetic heel bone mineral density in the Neolithic reflects adaptation to the decreased mobility indicated by decreased femoral bending strength. This study provides a model for interpreting phenotypic changes predicted from ancient DNA and demonstrates how they can be combined with phenotypic measurements to understand the relative contribution of genetic and developmentally plastic responses to environmental change.
    Last edited by Token; 07-06-2019 at 07:20 PM.

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  17. #2619
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    Not aDNA but relevant considering previous assertions of Early-Modern-Human/Neanderthal contact! AMH-like Cranium from Greece dated to > 210kya!

    Apidima Cave fossils provide earliest evidence of Homo sapiens in Eurasia

    Abstract

    Katerina Harvati, Carolin Röding, Abel M. Bosman, Fotios A. Karakostis, Rainer Grün, Chris Stringer, Panagiotis Karkanas, Nicholas C. Thompson, Vassilis Koutoulidis, Lia A. Moulopoulos, Vassilis G. Gorgoulis & Mirsini Kouloukoussa

    Two fossilized human crania (Apidima 1 and Apidima 2) from Apidima Cave, southern Greece, were discovered in the late 1970s but have remained enigmatic owing to their incomplete nature, taphonomic distortion and lack of archaeological context and chronology. Here we virtually reconstruct both crania, provide detailed comparative descriptions and analyses, and date them using U-series radiometric methods. Apidima 2 dates to more than 170 thousand years ago and has a Neanderthal-like morphological pattern. By contrast, Apidima 1 dates to more than 210 thousand years ago and presents a mixture of modern human and primitive features. These results suggest that two late Middle Pleistocene human groups were present at this site—an early Homo sapiens population, followed by a Neanderthal population. Our findings support multiple dispersals of early modern humans out of Africa, and highlight the complex demographic processes that characterized Pleistocene human evolution and modern human presence in southeast Europe.

    Source: Nature
    Last edited by blackflash16; 07-10-2019 at 05:30 PM.

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  19. #2620
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    You just beat me to it. Dynamite!

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